STUTTERING

Some degree of dysfluency is normal for everyone.  In young children, it is not unusual to hear hesitations and sound or syllable repetitions.  This may be especially true when a child is tired or excited. These periods of normal dysfluency typically don’t last longer than a few months. 

 

Stuttering can manifest in many different ways, including:

  • Sound, syllable or whole word repetitions

  • Sound prolongations

  • Voiceless blocks (instances where the person appears to want to speak but no sound comes out)

  • Frequent hesitations

  • Prolonged pauses during speech

  • Tense facial expressions accompanying speech

  • Fear of speaking

 

If left untreated, persistent stuttering will typically continue to develop into adulthood. In addition to the above-listed stuttering behaviours, prolonged dysfluency can lead to fear or anxiety when the need to speak arises, which may develop into social anxiety. This can lead to avoidance of speaking in order to prevent embarrassment associated with stuttering.

 

The way people experience and cope with stuttering varies between individuals. For some, dysfluency does not interrupt their daily function. For others, it impacts all aspects of their life. Speech therapy will therefore be tailored to your individual needs and experiences. Goals may include fluency shaping techniques and desensitization exercises to reduce the impact of stuttering.

CONTACT

MAIN/MAILING ADDRESS:  
12-111 Fourth Ave., Suite 143, St. Catharines, ON L2S 3P5

SATELLITE LOCATION:  

1600 Kerns Rd., Burlington, ON, L7P 3G9

EMAIL:      natalia@voiceboxoffice.com

PHONE:    (905) 220-8377

FAX:          (888) 349-0448

If you have questions or concerns about your voice, speech, or communication, please contact me to arrange an assessment or phone consultation.

 

I look forward to speaking with you!

© 2016 by the Voice Box Office